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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm remembering about a year ago there was a thread or two on different types of wrappers, fillers and leaves and how the combinations added to the complexity and taste. I can't find that thread... anybody remember it or have that information?
 

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Let me know if you find it. I'd be interested in reading it as well. I've read a little about Maduro and natural wrappers, long and short fillers, curing, but would like to know more.
 

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Churchlady said:
I'm remembering about a year ago there was a thread or two on different types of wrappers, fillers and leaves and how the combinations added to the complexity and taste. I can't find that thread... anybody remember it or have that information?
Church Lady

This is not a thread, but something I had on my computers cigar db.

Mike

Cigar Wrappers:
The most obvious of the three cigar components, the wrapper is the easiest to discern for most cigar smokers. Industry experts claim that up to 75% of the flavor of a cigar comes from the wrapper! These leaves should be thick and oily feeling, smooth and uniform in color, and with small veins running through the leaf. Flaky, dry, and thin wrappers are the bane of cigar enthusiasts and can ruin the overall pleasure of the event. Although wrappers are actually categorized by country of origin, most cigar smokers identify wrappers by color.
A.M.S. or American Market Standard wrappers are light green in color and offer a sweet sour flavor that is akin to green apples. Also known as Double Claro, Jade, and Candela, these wrappers are primarily grown in The United States and were extremely popular during the origins of the cigar industry in the USA. Ironically, even though this wrapper is uniquely American, this leaf is unpopular today.
E.M.S. or English Market Standard wrappers are rich brown in color and are truly the industry standard today. Made popular by English smokers in the 19th century, this wrapper is also known for its variant names such as Claro (somewhat lighter), Colorado (somewhat richer in color), and Natural; a catch-all term for this category. The best E.M.S. wrappers are grown in the Vueleta Abajo region in Cuba, Connecticut, and Cameroon.
Maduro wrappers are now very popular and can be easily spotted by their dark brown to black colors. This color is achieved by allowing the temperature during fermentation to surpass 165 F. This process requires are thicker wrapper to achieve a rich, sweet, smooth flavor that is popular with more experienced smokers looking for more flavor. Other grades of this leaf are known as Double Maduro and Oscuro. The best maduro wrappers come from Connecticut and the San Andreas region of Mexico.

Cigar Binders:
Binders are the tobacco leaf that actually holds the cigar together. Once the filler is folded according to its blend, then the binder is applied and the cigar is rolled. Then the cigar is placed in molds until ready for the application of the wrapper.
Almost any place where cigar filler or wrapper is grown, binders are also harvested as often the thicker tops of the tobacco plant is used for this purpose. The better binders come from Cuba, Connecticut, Mexico, and Ecuador today although Java and Sumatra binders are highly prized for there durability and flexibility.
Cigar Fillers:
Cigar filler is grown primarily around The Caribbean, Central and South America, and Mexico. The most treasured leaf comes from the Vuelta Abajo region of Cuba which produces a rich, smooth, spicy, sweet flavor that reflects the volcanic soil found there. Often cigars are blended with leaf from other regions, harvests, and countries to produce a wide variety of flavors and strengths that fit different tastes and moods.
Jamaican filler tends to be lighter in body and sweet. These tobaccos are found in Temple Hall Estates, Macanudo, and Cifuentes to name just a few.
Dominican filler, reflecting the wide variety of climates, altitudes, and soils found there, offer perhaps the widest variety of characteristics and flavors. As a rule of thumb, these cigars are medium bodied with sweet undertones. Partagas, Davidoff, and Arturo Fuente are some of the best known Dominican cigar manufacturers today.
Honduran filler tends to provide a richer smoke with coffee tones. Importation of cigars from Honduras are on the incline and it is now the second most imported cigar into the United States. Such cigars as Hoyo de Monterrey, Punch, and Zino are made in Honduras for the American Market.
Nicaraguan filler is also gaining in popularity and tends to also be rich with spicy and earthy tones. Joya de Nicaragua and Padron Aniversario are noted cigars manufactured in that region.
Mexican filler has the reputation of being strong, sweet, and spicy. Although many Mexican cigars do portray these characteristics, much Mexican leaf is actually light in body with creamy sweetness! This leaf is often exported and blended in with Jamaican and Dominican tobacco. TeAmo, San Andreas, and Matacan are well known Mexican cigars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the link - OMG LMFAO!!! Yea, don't see too many of those guys around anymore, We lost a great man in Cashcow! That's what drew me to this board in the first place.
 
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