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Chimpus herfustus
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there has been a lot of debate in the past on how much a wrapper contributes to a cigar's flavor. This may seem like kind of a newbie question but I was just curious as to what the different wrapper types give to a cigar. Are some very powerfully flavored? Are some very subtle and let the filler and binder really come through? There must be. We have corojo, connecticut, sungrown, shade grown, ecuadorian, cameroonian, etc, etc. When I hear that cigar A has sun grown wrapper B I don't really know what that means. :confused: I like certain cigars but I don't know if the flavors I'm tasting are from the wrapper or not. Any gorrilas out there have any info on wrapper characteristics?

SB
 

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IMHO the wrapper plays a large part in defining the flavor. Take a Padron for example purposes: We'll start with the natural which for comparison purposes has the typical "Padron" flavor, the maduro adds a sweetness to the taste and aroma, a sungrown or shadegrown would add an earthy pungent kick to it as well as spice possibly, corojo adds strength and full flavor etc... Other types of wrapper such as sumatra or ecuadorian or cameroon would add other subtler changes mind you, in the Padron example, wouldn't neccesarily "go" with the Padron "blend". Ashton VSG's great flavor and spice comes from the wrapper, the key in making the perfect blend is to find the right combination of filler to compliment the wrapper of course and that is why we'll always be trying new blends. This is my viewpoint and personal experience i am sharing and the way "I" see it :D .
 

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Chimpus herfustus
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Lord Hammer-

Could one make the assumption that sun-grown wrappers will have a more robust flavor than a shade-grown? Also, why is it such a big deal to have a sun-grown wrapper from the Domincan Republic? Isn't that the hype behind Opus X and Ashton VSG?

SB
 

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SilvrBck said:
Lord Hammer-

Could one make the assumption that sun-grown wrappers will have a more robust flavor than a shade-grown? Also, why is it such a big deal to have a sun-grown wrapper from the Domincan Republic? Isn't that the hype behind Opus X and Ashton VSG?

SB
To answer your first question in my experience sun-grown is more robust and spicier, yes. Hype? No, no...they have special farms that grow just this particular wrapper as they do for the rosado wrapper for the Opus X. These wrappers are very unique in their cultivation and are located at the private "Fuente Estate" which happens to be in the DR. How they got to the DR is a long story in itself but this is where the Fuentes set up to grow these exclusive wrappers, so exclusive as to explain the cost associated with Opus X or Ashton Vsg. They're availability speaks for itself, in my opinion there is no hype concerning these two wrappers...the cream of the crop. Also FYI, i haven't seen a better sungrown wrapper than the one used for the Ashton Vsg, if you haven't tried one don't say i didn't warn you ;) .
 

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As I understand it (from the Fuente DVD), wrappers simply are not grown in the DR. Don't now why. Maybe the soil isn't right, or the prevailing weather conditions, they just can't get the superior quality leaves needed for the wrapper. When Carlos set out to try to make a DR puro, everyone told him he was nuts. The Opus X is the only cigar out there that consists entirely of Dominican tobacco.
 

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What would Skeeter do?
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drc is right. You just don't see a lot of wrapper leaf from the DR, although there is some besides Fuente. I believe Ramon Allones has a DR grown leaf, for example.

Lord Hammer hit the nail on the head. hehe. The wrapper leaf is like icing on a cake. You might not want to put strawberry icing on an orange cake, etc. Cameroon, is a prime example of how much a wrapper leaf impacts the flavor of a cigar. I believe Cameroon was discovered when they planted Indonesian Sumatra seed in West Africa, & viola! They got a totally different flavor profile.
 
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