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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was asked by a friend: "Why does it take such a long time to age cubans if this leaf is so superior?" I said "they just do". But seriously, you can give a good domestic a few month in the humi and it will improve considerably. Not with habanos, i hear people saying that they need two, three even four years or more for the cigar to develop. While I know that people say this from personal experience I can't find a logical explanation for this. I'll probably end up with the same response I gave to my friend huh?:D
 

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Nely said:
I was asked by a friend: "Why does it take such a long time to age cubans if this leaf is so superior?" I said "they just do". But seriously, you can give a good domestic a few month in the humi and it will improve considerably. Not with habanos, i hear people saying that they need two, three even four years or more for the cigar to develop. While I know that people say this from personal experience I can't find a logical explanation for this. I'll probably end up with the same response I gave to my friend huh?:D
Like my grandma always said, It's in the water.
 

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Maybe its in the poop? Sure smell like it. The sad thing is until now I always hated the smell of poop. Now I enjoy the smell..
 

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Nely said:
I was asked by a friend: "Why does it take such a long time to age cubans if this leaf is so superior?" I said "they just do". But seriously, you can give a good domestic a few month in the humi and it will improve considerably. Not with habanos, i hear people saying that they need two, three even four years or more for the cigar to develop. While I know that people say this from personal experience I can't find a logical explanation for this. I'll probably end up with the same response I gave to my friend huh?:D
I'd like to know this as well.

I'd also like to know more about different ash colors, what's desirable, and what's not.

And why it is that Cuban cigars (from pictures and also from what I've heard) sometimes have green waterspots on their wrappers, yet very few non-cubans do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jokieman said:
I'd like to know this as well.

I'd also like to know more about different ash colors, what's desirable, and what's not.

And why it is that Cuban cigars (from pictures and also from what I've heard) sometimes have green waterspots on their wrappers, yet very few non-cubans do.
you better go start your own stupid questions thread then. This one is mine!:D
 

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what do the advertisers of non-cubans always say to make your mouth water?

"these cigars are made with filler that's been aging 5 yrs before it was even rolled...."
"we accidentally found this bale of wrapper in the warehouse, it's 18 yrs old!!!"

hey, they give you a "born on date" on the bottom... they don't have "most" of their filler/wrapper/binder sitting around in ageing rooms for 5 yrs+ (some "special" cigars are reported to be made with pre-aged tobacco, like reservas)....

it's up to US, the consumer, to age cuban cigars...
 

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The following post is a bit long, but it should answer your question. This literature can be found at www.cigargroup.com. Hope it helps....

A cigar is constructed from tobacco leaves. While it is true comparatively speaking, that certain types of tobacco will 'age better' than others, the fact remains that all tobacco, by nature, is living matter - and as such, will steadily alter over a period of time. Veteran smokers will for example select specific Habanos for long-term aging due to decades long experience with that particular blend; it is a simple fact certain blends of tobacco yield greater results from aging than others. Some cigars, it has been found, will mature over a period of time, then cease to offer any added advantage with increased aging. In those cases, it's not as if the cigars stop aging (remember, the compositional evolution is on-going), it's only that with certain cigars, no greater enhancement will be realized after a period of time. Yet, other blends continually improve with greater, and greater maturation.

Key in this argument is the issue of 'proper' maintenance. Even with cigars that are known to 'age well', with long term storage (5, 10, 20 or more years), proper maintenance (humidity/temperature) is extremely critical. It's one thing to practice haphazard storage with a box of cigars that are to be consumed within a month or so after purchase - it's an entirely different issue when one is considering the storage of cigars for even six months -- let alone 6 years.

We should not confuse long term aging of cigars with short term maturation. These days, more often than not, cigars are brought to market in a 'green' state; to derive any measure of enjoyment from a 'fresh' cigar, requires a bare minimum of 3 to 4 weeks just to marry the tobaccos, smooth off the roughness in taste, and bring the cigars up to par. On the other hand, long term aging is a process that will mature a cigar to a highly refined state, that greatly alters a cigars character. In Europe (particularly in England), the aging (or laying down) of cigars is a time honored practice, that is just beginning to find popularity in North America.

How long will it take to properly age my cigars?
3 weeks will stabilize the mechanical tensions and moisture of a cigar, making it smoke better. 3 months will allow the oils to begin to migrate and flavors of the blend to marry. 2-3 years (in a suitable environment) will allow some of the more complex chemical processes of true aging to take place, and create subtle flavor changes...

and are there any special incidentals I need to know?
The tobacco in most premium cigars is aged for 18 months to 2 years before rolling. In high-end premiums it's often aged 3 years, and some special blends use tobacco up to 15 years old! Regardless, many manufacturers will roll cigars from this aged tobacco, and then hold them (now rolled) for another 1-2 years before shipping. It's unfortunate that so many of the new "boutique" cigars becoming popular are in such demand that their manufacturers are shipping them directly off the roller's tables, without this necessary "post-rolling" aging. This leaves it to either the distributers or the end smokers to hold these "green" cigars until they stabilize, marry, or age - whatever your pleasure.

Aging cigars, as wine involves very complex chemical processes. Oxidation, slow chemical changes, blending of essential oils are all involved.
 

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Nely said:
I was asked by a friend: "Why does it take such a long time to age cubans if this leaf is so superior?" I said "they just do". But seriously, you can give a good domestic a few month in the humi and it will improve considerably. Not with habanos, i hear people saying that they need two, three even four years or more for the cigar to develop. While I know that people say this from personal experience I can't find a logical explanation for this. I'll probably end up with the same response I gave to my friend huh?:D
Many times the tobacco rolled in non-Havanas can be aged before they even roll it. In Cuba they roll them as soon as the leaves are ready to be rolled and roll as many as possible staying within certain new quality assurance guidelines.
Many times in cigars from outside of Cuba, the tobacco has already sat for months upon months (or longer) prior to being rolled & even after being rolled, they can sit for quite some time.
This is what I have heard over the years from many folks more experienced than myself.

I'd also like to know more about different ash colors, what's desirable, and what's not.
In most cases (although not all cases), Cuban cigars will have a darker ash than non Cubans . What I have come to understand is that its due to the soil properties of where the tobacco is grown. In Cuba, it is believed the soil lacks certain chemicals (ie: phosphorus, magnesium and calcium which are normally found in many commercial fertilizers). Since Cuba never was a very rich country, commercial grade fertilier wasnt commonly used if ever, thus the darker ash.
Which color is more desireable? I guess that depends on personal preference and what you're smoking!

And why it is that Cuban cigars (from pictures and also from what I've heard) sometimes have green waterspots on their wrappers, yet very few non-cubans do.
I believe it has to do with a couple possibilities:

the quality assurance practices non-Havana cigar employ (rejecting any obvious visual issues)
or
the way the tobacco is subjected to either rain or watering practices. (Sun beaming thru water on a leaf causes the green spots you see often on Havana tobacco.

I cant say for sure on this one, but this would be my best guess.

Hope this helps
 

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floydp said:
Maybe its in the poop? Sure smell like it. The sad thing is until now I always hated the smell of poop. Now I enjoy the smell..
I'll be sure to let the Mrs. know this so you can clean the bathrooms since it doesn't bother you any more!! :r
 

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Nely said:
.....But seriously, you can give a good domestic a few month in the humi and it will improve considerably. .....
I would like to add that "domestics" do improve with years of age as well. I am not sure why this does not have the same mystique as aging Cubans. Perhaps because the change is not as pronounced? FWIW

_____
rm
 

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Great post poker, can't be said better than that
 

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Nely said:
I was asked by a friend: "Why does it take such a long time to age cubans if this leaf is so superior?" I said "they just do". But seriously, you can give a good domestic a few month in the humi and it will improve considerably.
Maybe you are making a huge generalization. Perhaps NC cigars are not as strong at the outset. I just smoked a 7 year old Miami LGC Wavell the other day and it was 1000 times better than it was new, and lots better than they were last itme I smoked one. It exploded with a tobacco and wine flavor and lots of layers of spice and nuts. Did it take this Non cuban 7 years to be that good...apparently.
 

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here is a link to another cigar board where a member typed out word for word what MRN has to say about aging and flavors. This also has a bit about what the wrapper adds to the cigar and the schools of thought behind it. It is lengthy, but an excellent read. It will echo what Poker and Max_It said the best.

CWise

hope this doesn't ruffle any feathers on here or fellow members that post here and CWise. My humblest apologies if it does.
 
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