Cigar Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Sneaky Bombin Bastage
Joined
·
2,569 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just starting to learn about cubans and I have a question concerning wrappers. I love maduro wrappers and that's about all I smoke in NC's. As I look at the pictures of cubans, I'm not really seeing any maduros except for maybe the EL's. Now I know a picture doesn't always do justice, but am I missing something? Am what I'm seeing and calling a dark natural really their maduro? Any opinions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,978 Posts
I asked the same question , here was the response



Originally Posted by mr.c
I have a question master mo, why isnt there many dark maduro wrappers on cuban cigars ?

MOTHEMAN's reply:

Supposedly the Criollo strain used for Habano wrappers doesn't cure well or smoke well as a Maduro.
Accor. to Poker, in a private conversation I had with him, the LE wrappers are the Habano2000 strain of tobacco, which didn't go well on most cuban cigars when it was first used. I'd only guess that Habanos feels it goes better when cured to a darker color, and then blended to bring out different tastes.
Personally, I think it's a marketing gimic. Although Cuba is communist, I believe that they're capitalists at heart and will act on an opportunity when they see it.
BTW, FYI, Habanos calls the dark color LE wrappers and abhors using the term Maduro -- they consider Connecticut Broadleaf to be the only true Maduro.
 

·
MoTheMentor
Joined
·
3,075 Posts
mr.c said:
MOTHEMAN's reply:

Supposedly the Criollo strain used for Habano wrappers doesn't cure well or smoke well as a Maduro.
Accor. to Poker, in a private conversation I had with him, the LE wrappers are the Habano2000 strain of tobacco, which didn't go well on most cuban cigars when it was first used. I'd only guess that Habanos feels it goes better when cured to a darker color, and then blended to bring out different tastes.
Personally, I think it's a marketing gimic. Although Cuba is communist, I believe that they're capitalists at heart and will act on an opportunity when they see it.
BTW, FYI, Habanos calls the dark color LE wrappers and abhors using the term Maduro -- they consider Connecticut Broadleaf to be the only true Maduro.
Thanks for the quote there mr.c.
I want to add that you can buy a box of, say, MC2 or a cabinet of Bolivar PC and end up with wrappers that range from the very light to the very dark. Yet the overall flavor won't be affected much, the consistency will still be there. That's something unique to Havanas that I've seen. The actual shade/color of the Criollo wrapper doesn't appear to affect the taste that much as it does the look. I do notice thought that when the wrapper has an oily sheen to it I seem to enjoy it more. :w
 

·
Sneaky Bombin Bastage
Joined
·
2,569 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info guys and thank you mr c. for putting up that post. I'm still learning about cubans and any information is greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Current production Cuban cigars come in any wrapper color, except candela. :pu :D
For example, many "newbies" will purchase their first box, and note the wrapper color. Then they will purchase a second box and the wrapper color will be much different. Alot of them will holler FAKES! But that is not necessarily the case. It is perfectly normal for the same size and brand to have different wrapper colors from box to box. Even with the exact same box code. HOWEVER, if the cigars vary in wrapper color more than just slightly WITHIN THE SAME BOX, BEWARE. That is a good indication of fakes. Cabinet selection cigars however will show more color variation than dress boxes.

As far as a "maduro" wrapper, there is no Cuban "maduro" in the same sense as a non-Cuban maduro. It is only a color designation.

Non-Cuban maduro wrappers are "cooked" at higher temperatures purposely to obtain the color and flavor. Some can even be "colored". I've had two ONYX Reserve maduros that actually left brown stains on my fingers!! LOL!

Cuban wrapper leaf is always fermented naturally. Here's a great little paragraph that explains it quite nicely:

http://www.cigarnexus.com/counsel/qanda/edition.03.html
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top