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HOT for HILLARY!!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had to go home this weekend to see the doctor so that gave me a chance to finish up the humidor I started building as "therapy" while laid up over Christmas after surgery.

So far its been holding steady at 68%. Im probably going to buy a pound of climmax beads for it and also build another tray for singles when I have the time/money.
 

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good job with that. i've had dreams of building my own... but i know me, and it would probably end up with 1/4" gaps on each corner!! :D
 

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Light's on..No one's home
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Hi Adam,

Nice job! Looks like a stack of wood piled up in the top draw.;) Glad to hear it is working so good. The climmax beads should do the trick.

Hope all is going well with your recovery from surgery. How mobile are you? How much longer before you are back to "normal"? Take care.
 

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HOT for HILLARY!!
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3,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the compliments guys

okie...i feel great now. doc says i can start playing lacrosse again, but I just have to take it really easy and feel it out. Should be 100% by the first week in Feb.
 

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That is Beautiful Adam. Like everyone else said, I could only wish to have the skills required to build something as magnificent as that. How long did it take you and what types of wood did you use?
 

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HOT for HILLARY!!
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks guys.

The box itself is 3/4" maple and 15/16" black walnut. That is where most of the time was spent. Since I dont have a planer to take the walnut down to 3/4", I had to redesign it around the joints (where its filled with the quarter round i made)....otherwise the difference would have been very noticable. The lining and shelf is spanish cedar, of course. That stuff is nasty to work with. As good as it smells, inhaling the dust sucks.

All in all, Id say maybe 15-20 hours of actual work. If I had a planer and jointer the time (and mistakes) would have been cut down a lot. If I had been smart and used simpler joints for the tools I have, that would have cut the time down a lot too.

Im probably going to be building more this summer. I really enjoyed it, so Im hoping to sell some on ebay or on our auction site and see if I can raise some more money for new power tools/boxes to fill it up. I still have a little more to go on it. I didnt have a chance to finish the stand I made for it and I need to rebuff it and get out some of the dried wax that you can see in the 2nd picture (I was in a rush and was hungover from my 21st:al )
 

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HOT for HILLARY!!
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3,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks...a good portion of my collection was donated to the "save a smokeless college student fund" from a couple of very generous gorillas on here. :D

...well that and my recent slide down the slippery slope...Ive been trying to save myself from the fall, but it looks like Im being sucked into a group purchase of some RyJ 2001 LE robs with some guys from my smoke shop back home. This could get ugly.
 

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HOT for HILLARY!!
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3,591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I don't think Arlin Liss has to worry just yet...but I hope to keep making humidors this summer when Im home. Im looking to do some nice inlay work and maybe an even bigger humidor for myself. Hopefully I can get it to pay for my cigar habit.
 

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Great job! I am currentyl in the process of designing something similar. I have never tried building something like this, so my skills are somewhat lacking. What basic tools would you need to make something like this? I have mitre saw, table saw, router, clamps, etc. I can't wait to start as I want to begin storing boxes of stogies to age. Thanks for any tips.
 

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HOT for HILLARY!!
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You have everything you need (Im assuming you have basic hand tools). If you have the cash to blow, get yourself a planer and jointer too. The planer (not power hand planer, but a real benchtop planer) will bring down your stock to uniform thickness and will also give you a much better finish than typical stuff coming out of the mill (unless you buy pre milled, which is more expensive). The jointer will give you perfect edges, which you will need if you are going to do any edge glueing (most likely you will if you are doing a larger humi...edge glueing is how i attached the maple and black walnut). You can do it with a table saw like i did, but it takes some extra work and patience to get it perfect so there are no tiny gaps. you will also need to figure out what type of joinery to use. I used rabbeted joints, which you can do on a tablesaw or on a router. if you go with dovetail or box joints, i would recommend getting a jig to use with your router. I built a jewlery box last year using box joints i did on the table saw...turned out pretty good. dovetails you will need a jig for however, unless you are doing them by hand...but thats a ways off, for me atleast.

beer is also very handy. it relieves pain and frustration quite well and, when empty, can be used as your shop ashtray.

one more thing...get yourself a cabinet scraper (and learn how to use it). they are only a couple of bucks. you use it instead of sanding and you get a super smooth surface without any of the blurring of the grain caused by sandpaper ripping into the wood.

feel free to post, pm, email, whatever if you have any questions. good luck
 
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