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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Here is 80F in summer and I don't have any solution for temp. I am using 69 rh boveda in humidor and humidity is 65-66 rh. I have only Cuban cigars.

Problem is cigars are spongy and have bitter taste. I made some research on internet and some web sites says that don't care actual humidity, use rh but take 70F / 70rh base and if temp goes 1 point up, take humidity one point down. For example

75 F / 65 F
78 F / 63 F
80 F / 60 F


What do you think about it? I am smoking for few months and I need your help.
 

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With so many Cuban's being fake, can I ask are you certain they're in fact Cubans? If your cigars are spongy at 65-66% I would be very tempted to cut one open and see what you have. search fake cubans and watch a few videos that will help you discern the difference . If they are real Cubans I guess I would consider a wineador. extended temperature above 73 can cause tobacco beetle larva to hatch. And that would be a shame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I bought it from La Casa Del Habano and unopened box. So it is %100 real Cuban. But I really need to know if this is true that:

70 F/ 70 rh
75 F / 65 rh
80 F / 60 rh
83 F / 57 rh

What do you think?
 

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Smoking Volunteer
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Bring your RH down slowly. Your cigars are way to wet for Havanas. I would shoot for low 60s, say 60-63% RH. But keep in mind that will take several weeks to attain if you are slow and careful.

Also, try to find the coolest place available, perhaps an interior closet or basement.
 

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Bitter taste is an indication of being too wet.

I don't know about the validity of the adjustment you've mentioned, but I don't subscribe to the old 70/70 rule-of-thumb either. Most around here prefer 65% RH not 70%. And I've heard many Cuban cigar smokers say they smoke better in the 60%-63% range.
 

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You can pick up a wineador for about $280.00 I would give that some serious thought. But yes, it's true higher temperatures require less humidity because the cigar will absorb more water which would make the cigar spongy.
 

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Walking Contradiction
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+1 for a wineador. When you have a minute, head over to the new member introductions thread and introduce yourself. Welcome to Puff


"Only the dead have seen the end of war." -Plato
 
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Trust Me, I'm Not Lion
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I am planning to buy wineador if I can find place for it at home. But now, for 80 F - 82 F, I need to have 58 rh - 62 rh right?
give up on the chart - forget temps

RH should be 60-65, within that range it is mostly preference.

Temps should be below 80 (or 70) if you can, like others said, find the coolest spot to keep your gars at.

Make sure neither fluctuates (swings) dramatically, and you'll be fine.

Trying to figure out things with maps charts and graphics will only complicate a very simple issue, and with as many opinions as there are, I'm sure someone will tell you an even "better" way to make your life more convoluted.
 

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The "rule of thumb" in the original post is backward: cigars don't care about relative humidity; they care about absolute humidity, or moisture content. We smokers use RH because it works across the spectrum of temps cigars are usually stored at. In other words, the amount of water vapor in the air at 60F 65RH is not the same as at 75F 65RH. But, who cares. Your boveda or beads are taking care of that by outputting the right amount of moisture at that temperature / air pressure to create 65 or 69 or 62 whatever RH. The amount of water vapor your cigars can hold, and that you want them to have, is a different absolute humidity at different temps, but largely the same RH at those temps.

BTW, I strongly recommend the wineador solution many others have mentioned. And I'd aim for around 62-63% RH, never above 65%.

- MG
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
For wineador, I am planning to buy next year because I don't have space for it at home right now. So I need to handle with 82 F in summer and 75 F in winter.

For 4 days, humidity is at 61 rh and today I checked it with fingers, with very little pressure with fingers, very little springy and if I use hard pressure with my fingers, I heard cracking.

I always had 67 rh - 72 rh, and always had issues and bad tastes and I really do not know how does good cigar tastes. :(


Is there any difference between 60-65 rh?
 

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The rule of thumb is it takes one week per 1 percent RH for a cigar to fully acclimate. So if you're bringing your cigars from 68% RH to 61% RH it will take about 7 weeks. I don't know if this has been actually tested and confirmed, but it seems like a decent place to start. My observations are that 62-65% produces better smoking and tasting cigars than 67-70% (the only two RH's I know I've tried).

FWIW, here's a link to a thread about why RH is important instead of absolute humidity:

http://www.cigarforums.net/forums/vb/general-cigar-discussion/206910-temperature-vs-humidity.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
After I read tests about humidity and temperature, now I dont care about actual humidity and temperature. I will try 63, 65 and 67 rh for Cubans and Nicaraguans which I bought today.

Now other question is what is taste difference between 63-67 rh.
 

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Wildman
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Bring your RH down slowly. Your cigars are way to wet for Havanas. I would shoot for low 60s, say 60-63% RH. But keep in mind that will take several weeks to attain if you are slow and careful.

Also, try to find the coolest place available, perhaps an interior closet or basement.
YES.

Bitter taste is an indication of being too wet.

I don't know about the validity of the adjustment you've mentioned, but I don't subscribe to the old 70/70 rule-of-thumb either. Most around here prefer 65% RH not 70%. And I've heard many Cuban cigar smokers say they smoke better in the 60%-63% range.
YES absolutely - too wet.

You can pick up a wineador for about $280.00 I would give that some serious thought. But yes, it's true higher temperatures require less humidity because the cigar will absorb more water which would make the cigar spongy.
With those temperatures a Wineador is the only real solution. Best investment I made for cigars. With a stash it's the only way to store them. I evolved up to a wineador from baggies, tupper ware, table top humidors to the wineador. First thing I noticed, after about a month in the wineador was consistency in the smokes that I had never achieved before. Now, I can buy by the box for the best price, and store them correctly so I can have a variety on tap.

Yes, it's an investment but it's overall the best way to go.
 

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Does anyone have any opinion about taste difference between 67,65,63 rh?
I would say 65 rh or a little below will get rid of bitterness, harshness, and will make flavors clearer, more recognizable. Also at 65 rh and under, you will have less burn issues, you will get even burn, cigars won't go out, and you won't have to re-light them if they go out. All this contributes to the overall enjoyment a cigar, in general.

Having said this, there are no shortcuts in learning this hobby. You should experiment with different rh and find what is good for you.
 

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Wildman
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^^^^. Yep. Moisture content in the cigar affects how they burn, the temperature of the burn and that's pretty much everything. Burn temperature affects the taste. Another thing is to get things settled down in terms of temperature and RH changes to allow the cigars to normalize and not be breathing.
 
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