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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I’ve avoided purchasing estate Pipes for 4 years because I don’t trust people. Just received my 1st estate and it’s a bit of a disaster in that regard.

Claimed to be expertly cleaned, one pass of a dry pipe cleaner through the stem came out black. The bowl also wiped black. Also, the bottom of the inside of the bowl has been over reamed as there is a deep divot below the draft hole.

The issues above, I can live with. But this pipe has a disgusting Lakeland Ghost. I could smell it while unboxing and after attempting clean it for about 15 minutes, I feel sick. I’m sure this sounds over exaggerated, but I really can’t tolerate the smell. I would never sell a pipe without putting that info in the listing, but this is probably why I don’t sell things for a living. I’d never make any money...

Any suggestions? I’ve read that even the ozone treatments probably won’t get this smell out and I don’t have the stomach to smoke a 100 bowls of Burley to exorcise this demon. Lol
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I’ve sent a message to the seller and have not heard back yet. I’m quite fond of this pipe and hope to find a way wash it of it’s sins, so to speak.
 

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I haven’t had much luck myself. I haven’t tried the ozone but I would think that it would probably have the best chance, it might take a few treatments IDK. Some people claim to have had success with coffee grounds and low heat in an oven. The salt and alcohol treatment I have done, it will reduce it but not eliminate it, same with a retort. I don’t think there’s any one treatment by itself that will totally eliminate it but a combination of several might.
I would start by reaming it to bare wood and then sand a little bit, then salt treatment and a retort then send it in for a couple of ozone treatments,
Check with the guy that does the ozone treatments and see what he’s got to say about it.
 

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The birth year Dunhill (1955) i bought and sent off to Mike Myers to get restored had a bad ghosting, not lakeland but i think English blends, i like English blends but rather have me smoking them than another person if you know what i mean, i has him give it the Ozone treatment, it was better but did not take all the ghosting away, not sure what would happen if you sent it to him to De-Ghost.
If you do be prepared for a long wait, mine took 3 months.
 

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I'd give it multiple salt and alcohol treatments, then a couple rum wipes. That's worked for me in a couple bad ones.

You may wanna sand the rest of the cake out. I use 800 grit wrapped around a sharpie and go round and round till it drives me insane or I'm down to wood.

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the responses. I heard back from the seller. He seems like a stand up guy and has offered to take it back for a full refund and pay for shipping. Regardless, this pipe has grown on me for the last couple days and I think I'm going to take the hit and see if I can baptize it. I've been doing a fair bit of reading on this and now understand why the ozone treatment is not necessarily useful in this type of case. Ozone attacks organic compounds. So a musty, rotten, stinky pipe reacts well to this type of treatment.

There seems to be many methods to attacking ghosts of this type, specifically Lakeland, which is most likely similar to an essential oil and has been absorbed deep into the briar. Many of the methods seem to be helpful until the pipe is heated during smoking. GL Pease has an article about a method he has has particular success with, which his is heating the briar, adding activated charcoal to the bowl and then putting back into the heat for a period of time. This seems to make sense to me, but I'm not crazy about running my oven in the house for an entire day just to pull ghosts out of a pipe and will that leave a scent in the oven? I'm not sure. I've read about guys who do 2-3 salt and alcohol treatments, followed by 2-3 coffee ground treatments and sometimes many cycles of this. Seems a bit tedious to save a pipe and I have not come to that level of desperation, yet.

Last night, I found an article from a guy who literally soaks the entire briar in a sealed jar of Isopropyl Alcohol until the liquid turns brown/black, and then changes out the alcohol again. Most likely the finish/stain will strip, but most importantly, this is drawing all of the oil and moisture out of the wood. It actually pulls so much moisture, that the pipes come out noticeably lighter in weight. Then he just applies a little wax or olive oil back into the wood after it has stabilized to give it some kind of finish. I think this is going to be my 1st plan. I've found that I really like what coconut oil (type that is liquid at room temp) does to bring out the grain in wood. I had an oak box made for me by an Etsy wood worker a while back and asked him to leave it finish sanded and unstained. This weekend, I rubbed coconut oil into the wood and it completely transformed it. I'm thinking of applying a couple more treatments and then I'll hand wax it.

Any way, I'll report back after I have tried the Alcohol Baptism. If the scent seems to have left, then I will be smoking some bowls of Five Brothers through it to test for ghost and fortify.
 

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Make sure it doesn't have a varnish finish. It'll bubble and come off in chunks. It this happens take nail polish remover and get rid of the rest. Then wax it up. If it's pebbled or rusticated in any way, it'll turn into a process getting all the varnish outta the nooks and crannies. I use dental picks with the tips filed kinda blunt for that crap.

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Erik @ebnash, I would be disgusted by someone else's Lakeland odor too. The only two I can smoke are Coniston and Ennerdale. I relegate Lakelands to my meer. It can get ghosted too of course but, because it's already "personalized" by virtue of being colored up, ghosting the meer somehow bothers me less.

I assume coconut oil either does not impart a coconut taste or odor, or you love toasted coconut LOL. In any case, good luck with your pipe rescue plan.
 

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It’s good that you decided to keep the pipe and work through the issue, I would be cautious about the coconut oil, I’m not aware of anyone that’s tried it so idk what the results might be. I do know of a few people that have used olive oil with bad results, it tends to go rancid after a while.
The pipes that I have stripped the finish on I simply waxed em and was very happy with the results, they do darken fairly quickly and I like the look. Please Keep us up to date on this project, I’m interested to see how it works out!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The coconut oil I'm using has no taste or smell and my sniffer is very powerful, but I will heed the warning. I have not put coconut oil on any pipes, yet, so I'll just wait to see what the alcohol soak does and report back.

I have read some articles about people using coconut oil to stain wood, specifically on butcher blocks ad cutting boards. Nothing seen yet , of it going rancid. I have read about this problem using olive oil...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
@OneStrangeOne this is a great idea. I'm usually very impatient and rush through projects like this, not bothering to take the time and document the work. I make no promises, but I'll start by showing some pictures of the pipe listing, a few crappy pics of the pipe when I received it, but had already starting cutting the cake and sanding the bowl.

This estate purchase was made on eBay from a seller with a high rating, but low volume of sales. It was listed as, "1960s STANWELL 86 Sixten Ivarsson Regd No 969-48 Hand Cut Made Pipe" Further details...

A beautiful 1960s specimen of Sixten Ivarsson's most iconic design for Stanwell -- the 86 oval-shanked bent pot. A refurbished piece of Danish smoking history ready for its next half-century of use!

This 50-60 year-old pipe has beautiful, high-contrast, flame grain around the bowl and desirable vintage stamping -- not just the "REGD.No. 969-48" and "Hand Made in Denmark" stamps on the shank, but also the desirable (and less common) "HAND CUT" stamp on the vulcanite stem. One other rarity -- the number "86" is not stamped anywhere on the pipe (a likely factory oversight that, according to Stanwell experts, is not unheard of on hand made pipes of this vintage). See the high-def video below (taken under directed LED lights that highlight surface irregularities, to make sure you are more than satisfied when the pipe arrives). Pipe ships securely packed via USPS First Class (w/ tracking), with a velvet drawstring bag and a new rubber pipe bit (for clenchers who like to protect their pipe stems from tooth chatter).

LENGTH: 5.25 inches
WEIGHT: 1.27 ounces
BOWL DIAMETER: 0.75 inches
BOWL DEPTH: 1.25 inches
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I did some additional clean out of the stem, where I found a lot of remaining gunk using some 151 Proof Grain alcohol and today I placed the Briar in a sealed container of 100% propanol. I plan to leave the briar in the propanol overnight and tomorrow morning when I get into work, I will pull the briar, do some additional brushing and swabbing of the shank, draft hole, and bowl.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ok, in to work this morning at 5:30ish and I popped the top on the container. Faint smell of rose douche in the alcohol, so I wasn't expecting much. Pulled the Briar and did some additional brushing and swabbing of the draft hole and shank. Wiped the bowl until paper towels were coming out clean. After the pipe dried out, I gave it a sniff and it's still possessed in a major way. Also, the stain was pretty much completely stripped and it's left looking like a character in Twilight...

So, I cut open a couple spent Nespresso Pods from my coffee maker on my desk and pulled the grounds. Rehydrated a little bit with water and packed the pipe to sit for ~24hrs or at least until the grounds look pretty dry.

A couple pics of the coffee packed and newly anemic pipe...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Quick update. After 3 rounds of coffee grounds treatment, I smell no recognize-able improvement. Now it’s sweet rose flavored coffee.

I was speaking with one of my fellow engineer coworkers about what I was trying to do as I have this whole setup going on my desk at work and he had a very interesting idea. He thinks it’s worth a shot using one of our lab chambers to pump the pipe down to VERY high vacuum and let it sit in there for 6-8 hours. Vacuum conditions at extreme low pressure will evaporate water and other chemicals which is why much semi conductor processing is done in high vacuum conditions. It is possible that it could draw out the oils that contain the scent in the pipe. Adding heat to that equation would push the process even harder.

There is some concern on my part what will happen to the structure of the briar when I’m bringing the chamber back up to atmosphere, so I will do it very slowly. This process of coming back up to atmospheric pressure is done by bleeding nitrogen into the chamber to minimize the amount of moisture introduced to the environment.

I’ll be back into work on Sunday and I think I’m going to try this because the science makes sense that it should work.

Wish me luck, LOL.
 

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Quick update. After 3 rounds of coffee grounds treatment, I smell no recognize-able improvement. Now it's sweet rose flavored coffee.

I was speaking with one of my fellow engineer coworkers about what I was trying to do as I have this whole setup going on my desk at work and he had a very interesting idea. He thinks it's worth a shot using one of our lab chambers to pump the pipe down to VERY high vacuum and let it sit in there for 6-8 hours. Vacuum conditions at extreme low pressure will evaporate water and other chemicals which is why much semi conductor processing is done in high vacuum conditions. It is possible that it could draw out the oils that contain the scent in the pipe. Adding heat to that equation would push the process even harder.

There is some concern on my part what will happen to the structure of the briar when I'm bringing the chamber back up to atmosphere, so I will do it very slowly. This process of coming back up to atmospheric pressure is done by bleeding nitrogen into the chamber to minimize the amount of moisture introduced to the environment.

I'll be back into work on Sunday and I think I'm going to try this because the science makes sense that it should work.

Wish me luck, LOL.
Good luck, Im following this one
 
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