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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello !

I'm very new to the cigar world, and after buying some and storing them inside plastic bags with Boveda 70%, I've decided to buy a Humidor (Adorini Chianti Deluxe).
One of the problem I had (which might be important for what comes next) is that I fear I might have received some old product, since the magnets behind the humidification unit were off of it, and the glue seemed dry... BUT the pre-calibrated hygrometer (analog, synthetic hair from Adorini) showed over 70% humidity right out of the (unopened !) box.

My main question being : after doing double calibration with damp cloth for 96% and salt paste for 76% (even when the manual said it wasn't necessary), the humidity inside the box itself after one night went above 75%, and I can't figure out what's wrong...
Here's a list of leads and issues :

-My weather app says the air humidity is above 90% where I live. It's been raining a lot lately. So I feel that leaving the humidor opened won't make it lower ?
-I may have dampened the wood too much when I prepared it ? I made 2-3 dampening with a clean sponge and distilled water, since it was drying off really quickly. Maybe it was too much and the cedar wood is too humid now ?
-I may have filled my humidifier unit with too much water too. I just kept going until there was some water excedent, but the crystals swelled a lot and are almost completely filling it. Is it possible that due to this, it releases too much humidity afterwards ?
-It's pretty hot these days, around 77-85° (25-30°C). This morning I've put the humidor (closed, and without the humidifier) in my basement, which is a bit colder. I hope the humidity will lower this way...
-I fear my hygrometer might be broken, as I said it showed over 70% humidity inside the box, unopened which feels weird since I've read everywhere that new humidor's wood is VERY dry and sucks up humidity a lot. I've tried blowing on it, and the needle seems to respond correctly (big jump to over 80%), but I had to calibrate it as it was going over 100% with the damp cloth test, and near 80% with the salt test. So in the end, I'm not sure it works as intended at all... I'm gonna make a test with a Boveda inside a sealed plastic bag to see if it shows the right value.

I feel that buying a good digital Hygro-Thermometer might be a good option, since it would be more accurate and faster than an analogue one ? But if mine is working well, it'd be wasteful to buy a new (expensive !) one for nothing...

If someone has a clue about what's going on, and how to make my Humidor go to 70%, even with "near tropical weather" currently happening where I live (85°F-30°C and over 90% humidity) I'd be very greatful, even more since I want to store my leftovers cigars in the best conditions, and that I want to buy more in the next days ^^

Thank you very much !
 

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Welcome to the forum. Humidors can be a hassle to get set up. It’s alway something, too wet, too dry, too hot, too cold. You spilled glycol in it... on and on it goes.

The first thing I’d recommend is a digital hygrometer. My local cigar store (you do support the local shop... right??) literally has a drawer behind the counter of analog hygrometers... THAT DON’T WORK. Even if you go the 65% Boveda pack route, the cost and piece of mind of monitoring some of those expensive sticks is well worth it IMO.

To soak some moisture out of a box, ask in the local tobacconist if they have any of the Spanish cedar sheets that come in some boxes of cigars. Put them in the humidor for a few days and after they have had a chance to absorb moisture remove them and see where your at.

BTW those cedar sheets make great starters for your fireplace. Post your results and let us know how it goes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your advices !
I planned on going to a huge store in Paris on Monday, I'll call them to ask in advance if they got digital Hygros and some extra wood to try this method :)

I'm not sure I want to use Bovedas all the time instead of a humidifier, it seems like high maintenance and cost :/
But it might be a good solution if nothing else works properly. I already have a big 72% that I use for storage since a month.

Thanks again
 

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Please, never wipe down wood. A little too much water in a corner and you'll have a really expensive accessory box. The wood will swell and joints will separate. A bowl of dw with a sponge in it for a few weeks is best.

Boveda are the way to go. They ARE rechargeable. If your hobby grows and you eventually move to plastic, they'll last for ever.

To recharge put em in a tupper with a bowl of dw. Wait a week or so, give em a feel. They'll be like new.

Humidifiers that come with humidors are leaky, mold magnets, that take up space(which will eventually be a problem).
Think about it. It's in the lid, you wet it down, shake it out, then close the lid. Gravity says any water left is going on your cigars.
Boveda can lay right on the cigars with no issues.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh, I didn't know that, it was written on the Humidor's manual to do so so I never questionned it...
I don't think I damaged it, but I'll keep ip it mind for another time.

Good to know about the Bovedas, I thoughtthey were a one time use.
Regarding the humidifier, mine is attached to the back panel of the cubic cave, so there's no danger of it leaking on the cigars or taking space, I have 3 trays that come right in front of it.
But I see your point ^^

Thanks !
 

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A "damp" sponge means different things to different people.

Around here we have the RANGER METHOD. A member , @Ranger0282 , decided he'd just take the sprayer in the sink and hose it down, then he took it outside and blew the water out with an air compressor. Kinda the ultimate " damp sponge " method..

Needless to say he ended up with an accessory box.. lol

In his defense, his smoking shack was also where he stored his gunpowder for reloading, his diesel fuel and his fertilizer for the farm. Yet he never blew himself up.. gotta give him credit for that

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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First of all, it generally takes weeks for a new wooden humidor to properly season. I'm guessing all this panic is coming right after buying it and wiping it down (as said, not really a good idea anyway). And, until you get an accurate, calibrated hygrometer you don't really know what RH issues you're dealing with anyway.

It'll take a lot of thin cedar sheets to soak up a little excess humidity. But I guess it's worth a try. More likely, you simply need to give it time to stabilize.

And just in case it hasn't fully sunk in yet:
  1. Analog hygrometers that come with most humidors suck.
  2. Foam humidifiers that come with most humidors suck.
  3. Wooden humidors can be a huge pain to maintain stable humidity in, especially cheap Chinese ones with paper thin veneer interiors instead of solid Spanish cedar.
  4. Don't trust salt calibration. Too easy to screw up.
  5. Bovedas work, and work to both increase and decrease RH as needed. No need to look beyond them.
  6. 70% RH is too high.
 

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For monitoring my humidor I am using Govee and LOVE IT: Govee Thermo/Hygrometer Digital Sensor
For cigar hydration I'm using the Cigar Oasis Excel 3.0 (COE for short): My analysis of the Cigar Oasis Excel 3.0 Electronic...

In the above post you will see my humidor. Not air-tight like Tupperware/Rubbermaid for sure but it works well. It took weeks, like, two months for my humidor to level out and that includes the extra boxes in the interior void to take up volume (side note: thinking about it I was concerned more about volume and not surface area, LOL, so adding the extra boxes may have not been the great idea I thought it was 🤔 :rolleyes: ). I did not wipe down the humidor! I only used the COE. When seasoning a humidor you need to be patient!

Only use distilled water ("dw" as some have abbreviated above), never well water or city water or bottled water or river water or rain water or etc. The impurities are removed from the water so you won't have to worry about mineral build-up or tainting the flavor of your cigars. This is the same water you would use for automotive radiators and, yes, it's 100% safe to drink it. It's super cheap, like about a dollar or less for a gallon where I live!

Humidor location can make a difference! My humidor is now in our basement, moved from our bedroom that was upstairs. It's really 1/2 below ground and 1/2 above ground. However, earth is a great insulator so the temp in our "1/2-ish basement" is quite consistent compared to the rest of the house. Looking at my Govee app, the temp averaged 69.8°F and ranged from 68°F to 71.1°F for the past 30 days. The RH average is 66.1% in a range of 65.5% to 67.3%. The more consistent temps help keep more consistent RH% because RH is dependent on temperature. Well, on pressure too but that's something that is a bit more stable ;) So my recommendation is, if you have a basement (surrounded by earth, essentially) then put the humidor there.
 
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